Tuesday, January 11, 2011

HINDI GRAMMAR 1 (Simple Sentence)

1. Let’s learn Hindi verb होना - honaa – to be.


                                                              

                         SINGULAR
              PLURAL

मैं हूँ
 main hoon
 I am
हम हैं 
 ham hain
 We are
तू है 
 too hai
 You are 1
-
 -
 -
तुम हो 
 tum ho
 You are 2
तुम हो
 tum ho
You are6
आप हैं
 aap hain
 You are3
आप हैं
 aap hain
You are 7
यह है
 yah hai
 He, she, this is 4
ये हैं 
 ye hain
They, these are8
वह है 
 vah hai
 He, she, that is 5
वे हैं
ve hain
They, those are9


तू
-          Is used in an extremely intimate context. We can use “तू है” with a very close friend, children,     lover or God (while in prayer). It should never be used with elders or in formal situations as it can be perceived as very rude.  
2 तुम
  
-          तुम” is a casual and friendly way to address someone. It is used with friends, younger people, children, younger siblings, servants and people whose position at work is lower (than yours). “तुम” is used in both: singular and plural.
3 आप
-          आप” is the politest form of “you”. It is used while addressing elders, superiors, people one doesn’t know, formal situations and all the other formal, polite and respectful situations. आप” is also used with both: singular and plural.
4 यह
-          यह” is used while talking about people and things that are located close to the speaker. It can be pronounced either as “yah” or “ye”. Genders are not distinguished in the third person.
5  वह
-          वह” is used while talking about people and things that are located   far from the speaker. It can be pronounced either as “vah” or “ve”.  It can be used with either gender. 
6 तुम
-          तुम” in plural is used in casual and friendly situations
7 आप
          Plural “आप” is used the same like singular. It should be used in polite and formal situations.
8 ये हैं 
-          ये is used to talk about people and things that are close to the speaker. Also, it is used to talk about someone elder or about someone with respect. Pronounced as “ye”.
9 वे हैं
-          वे is used to talk about people and things that are far from the speaker. Also to talk about someone with respect (like parents).

2. After learning Hindi verb “to be” in Present Tense we can pass over some basic information about ourselves:


मैं दीपक हूँ।
main deepak hoon
I am Deepak.
मैं आदमी हूँ।
main aadmee hoon
I am a man.
मैं डॉक्टर हूँ।
main DaakTar hoon
I am a doctor.
मैं भारतवासी हूँ।
main bhaatvaasee hoon
I am Indian.
मैं खुश हूँ।
main khush hoon
I am happy.
मैं जेन हूँ।
main jen hoon
I am Jane.
मैं औरत हूँ।
main aurat hoon
I am a woman.
मैं गायक हूँ।
main gaayak hoon
I am a singer.
मैं अमरीकन हूँ।
main amreekan hoon
I am American.
मैं खुश हूँ।
main khush hoon
I am happy.


3. Now please have a look at this dialogue between two women that pass by in the neighborhood. One is a curious maid and the other one is a foreigner.

Possible answers to yes/no Hindi questions are:

हाँ जी
haan jee
yes (polite)
जी हाँ
jee haan
yes (polite)
जी 
jee
yes (polite)
जी नहीं
jee naheen
no (polite)
हाँ
haan
yes (casual)
नहीं
naheen
no (casual)
शायद
shaayad
mabe
पता नहीं
pataa naheen
I don’t know
मालूम नहीं
maaloom naheen
I don’t know

सुनीताः
 नमस्ते!
जेनः
 नमस्ते!
सुनीताः
 आप कौन हैं?
जेनः
 मैं जेन हूँ.
सुनीताः
 क्या आप अंग्रेज हैं?
जेनः
 जी नहीं, अंग्रेज नही हूँ, अमरीकन हूँ।
सुनीताः
 क्या आप एक्ट्रेस हैं?
जेनः
 जी नही, मैं गायक हूँ।
सुनीताः
 अच्छा, आप बहुत सुन्दर हैं!
जेनः
 धन्यवाद, आप भी बहुत सुन्दर हैं।
सुनीताः
क्या आप विवाहित हैं?
जेनः
जी, विवाहित हूँ।
सुनीताः
ठीक है फिर, नमस्ते।
जेनः
नमस्ते।

Sunita:
Namaste!
Jen:
Namaste!
Sunita:
Aap kaun hain?
Jen:
Main Jen hoon.
Sunita:
Kyaa aap angrez hain?
Jen:
Jee naheen, angrez naheen hoon, amreekan hoon.
Sunita:
Kyaa aap Ektres hain?
Jen:
Jee naheen, main gaayak hoon.
Sunita:
Acchha, aap bahut sundar hain!
Jen:
Dhanyavaad, aap bhee bahut sundar hain.
Sunita:
Kyaa aap vivaahit hain?
Jen:
Jee, vivaahit hoon.
Sunita:
Theek hai phir, namaste.
Jen:
Namaste!

Sunita:
Hello!
Jane:
Hello!
Sunita:
Who are you?
Jane:
I am Jane.
Sunita:
Are you British?
Jane:
No, I am not British, I am American.
Sunita:
Are you an actress?
Jane:
No, I am a singer.
Sunita:
I see, you are very beautiful!
Jane:
Thank you, you also are very beautiful.
Sunita:
Are you married?
Jane:
Yes, I am married.
Sunita:
O.K. then, good-bye.
Jane:
Good-bye!

Dialogue vocabulary:

नमस्ते!
namaste
Hello!/Good-bye!
कौन
kaun
who
क्या
kyaa
what , (question marker)
अंग्रेज
angrez
British
अमरीकन
Amreekan
American
एक्ट्रेस
ekTres
actress
गायक
gaayak
singer
अच्छा
acchhaa
I see/ Good
बहुत
bahut
very
सुन्दर
sundar
beautiful
धन्यवाद
dhanyavaad
thank you
भी
bhee
also/ too/ as well
विवाहित
vivaahit
married
ठीक है
Theek hai
O.K./alright
फिर
phir
then



Here is some vocabulary you can use for practicing building “I am…” and “You are…” sentences.

विष्णु
viShNu
Vishnu
अर्जुन
arjun
Arjun
वरुण
varun
Varun
राधा
raadhaa
Radha
माया
maayaa
Maayaa
नेहा
nehaa
Neha



लड़का
laDkaa
boy
लड़की
laDkee
girl
आदमी
aadmee
man
औरत
aurat
woman
बच्चा
bacchaa
child (m)
बच्ची
bacchee
child (f)



विद्यार्थी
vidhyaarthee
student
अध्यापिका
adhyaapikaa
teacher (f)
अभियान्ता
abhiyaantaa
engineer
दुकानदार
dukaandaar
shopkeeper
पर्यटक
paryaTak
tourist
लेखक
lekhak
writer



भारतवासी
bhaaratvaasee
Indian
अंग्रेज
angrez
British
अमरीकन
amreekan
American
स्पेनिश
spenish
Spanish
फ्रांसीसी
fraanseesee
French
जर्मन
jarman
German



खुश
khush
happy
नाराज
naaraaj
angry
ठीक
Theek
fine
सुन्दर
sundar
beautiful
तेज़
tez
fast
देर
der
slow

                 Was this lesson any useful? Please comment so that we can improve. Thank you.


                                



                                                         

                                           

19 comments:

Angus said...

Thank you for your latest efforts Egle. Everytime I watch one of your videos or read what you have written I learn even more things. I really do !. Keep up the good work. Angus.

CrazyLassi said...

Thanks so much for your support and comments. If not you, I would think I'm making all these videos only for myself, lol. I'm happy if you find them of use, I really am!!! :)

Kay Rush said...

Hi Crazy Lassi, my name's Kay. I live in France and Italy and I've just started studying Hindi. Your blog and youtube channel are priceless! Thanks and keep up the good work. Kay

CrazyLassi said...

Dear Kay, thanks for the nice comment. I really think my blog and channel are basic but I'll try to make them better :)

Erich said...

very useful, thx :)

hari said...

vry much helpful

Anonymous said...

danyavaadh

Dr.C.SriramMurthy said...

very useful and vivid way of presenting Hindi for leareners .why not you devise a method where grammer and vocublary to learn hindi go hand in hand continuously instead of one lesson at a time.
Please give home work for learners and answers also for correction by the learners.The course is excellent and you can aswell give Continuous video lessons or a Video disc for members without internet connection for some price?


Dr.C.SriramMurthy said...

very useful course.Why not you arrange the course in a continuous way so that we can learn daily .Why not make a DVD for non net learners for some price.Very lucid and easy way of learning hindi.

CrazyLassi said...

@ Dr.C.SriramMurthy Thank you so much for your comment and suggested ideas. It indeed would be great to do what you suggested but this blog is only our part time hobby (when we have free time). It would be quite difficult for us at this moment to offer a full time professional Hindi learning program, but it's a great idea! We should try! Have a nice day! Egle/Vikram

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Sai Trisha said...

useful

Anonymous said...

dhanyabad! gracias! muchas gracias1

Anonymous said...

Please, could you explain why you write "DaakTar" with capital letters D and T? And for example in word "laDkaa". Is there a particular reason?
Thank you!

CrazyLassi said...

Yes, there is a reason! I use capitals for retro flex consonants that don't have analog in English.

For example there are 2 "t" sounds in Hindi:
त (ta) and ट (Ta). The first one is pretty much literal, just like "t" in English. The second one is also "t" but the sound is produced by placing the tongue deep back in the throat so it sounds a bit jumpy, a bit tonal and deeper. Note how Hindi speakers pronounce "train". So I would write the last "t" in capital in order to distinguish it.

The same is with 'sh' श and 'Sh'ष.
Or with 'na' न and 'Na' ण.

(It's my own way of marking, not the official one).

Anonymous said...

I see, thanks :)

Anonymous said...

Thank you... Very Good content for learners....

Manav Sharma said...

i am so said ...becase my english speaking very low ....

Pvijay said...

Very good content for learners. I came across this site, http://hindibasha.com where beginners can learn how to draw and pronounce Hindi alphabets. Please take a look at this.

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